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‘So…’ Podcast Episodes

LIST OF EPISODES

  • The strength in being vulnerable – Rugare Gomo

    In Australia we rely on the Western media to hear about what’s happening across the globe. It shows us filtered versions of important world events and the voices of people these news stories are about can often be missed.

    Rugare Gomo, founder of the Gomo Foundation, joins the So…Podcast to bring some of these voices to listeners everywhere.

    Rugare grew up in Zimbabwe, in a context where white people were considered better than black people, where being gay could get you put in jail and where men were considered more valuable than women. Even though the women in his life were smart, entrepreneurial and driven, they were deprived of opportunity.

    He came to Australia when he was 16 with just a suitcase and the dream of having an education he would never have in his home country.

    Rugare lets us in on the ups and downs of his journey, from raising over $100,000 for his university education, to becoming a lawyer, to feeling alone and unhappy and eventually founding the Gomo Foundation.

    He started this not-for-profit to unleash the potential of girls in Africa through education. It has now grown into an organisation that gives young girls a voice and empowers them to create opportunity for themselves.

    His story is a unique one, that has seen many different sides of the world and significant tests and challenges. But, through the power in vulnerability, Rugare was able to accomplish everything he had ever wanted and more.

    Options to access to the podcast episode are:

    YouTube with Subtitles/Closed Captions (c)

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    Whooshkaa podcast audio player

    *Transcript of this interview is also available*

  • SHHHH! Can we talk for a moment about turning down the noise?

    It may sound like a contradiction, to have a chat about being more quiet. But that’s exactly what John does with Christine Jackman in this podcast.

    Christine’s 20-year career as a journalist took her to New York as a foreign correspondent and Canberra, where she worked in Australia’s National Press Gallery, covering federal politics. Then she was headhunted to corporate communications where she gave advice to some of Australia’s top business and political leaders.

    Along the way, her life got very noisy and her health and family relationships suffered. So she quit her job and went on a journey to find out what was creating the “noise” in her life, what it was doing to her (according to scientific and medical research) and whether there were ways to reduce the unhealthy impacts of living in a noisy modern world.

    John and Christine chat about what she discovered: about the noise in our heads, as well as the noise around us; the distraction of the news and social media; the healing power of Nature and meditation; and the challenges of going on a 10-day silent retreat.

    Christine also gives some tips about how to incorporate more quiet places and practices into your own life.

    Her book Turning Down the Noise was published in Australia in September 2020 by Murdoch Books, and will be released in the United Kingdom in early 2021.

    Options to access to the podcast episode are:

    YouTube with Subtitles/Closed Captions (c)

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    *Transcript of this interview will soon be available*

    Whooshkaa podcast audio player

  • Danielle Matthews “How do I tell stories?…I sing”

    The creative behind I’ve Never BIN to Me (YouTube) joins the So…Podcast to talk about the power of music.

    After taking inspiration from the viral Facebook page ‘Bin Isolation Outing’, which encouraged individuals in lockdown to fancy dress while taking the bin out, Danielle Matthews decided to put her spin on ‘dressing up’ to take the bin out.

    She wrote a parody of I’ve Never Been to Me by Charlene, exploring what it felt like to be in lockdown in Victoria.

    After 48 hours her video had 1 thousand views. Danielle realised that her parody did more than make people laugh, it connected with other people who have also been struggling in lockdown.

    And Danielle is not only an internet sensation. She is a ‘born singer’, working professional for over 20 years. She says that she grew up singing, and there was never a question of what path she would follow.

    This path has taken her around the world, seeing incredible things and meeting incredible people, eventually bringing her back to Melbourne where she is the Co-Artistic Director of the Choir of Hard Knocks.

    This Choir displays the power and beauty of music. A choir for people who experience all kinds of disadvantage, it has shown Danielle that no matter what people go through, the music never leaves and it can always bring back joy.

    Danielle brings her warmth and vibrant love for music to the So…Podcast… if you listen closely there might even be a surprise tune!

    Options to access to the podcast episode are:

    YouTube with Subtitles/Closed Captions (c)

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    *Transcript of this interview will soon be available*

    Whooshkaa podcast audio player

  • Drawing the talk with Simon Kneebone

    In this episode John chats with Simon Kneebone – a cartoonist who’s work has been featured in a number of places, including many social and community organisations. Simon had his start as a cartoonist by simply doodling and drawing pictures during his time at university. Someone he had studied with remembered his drawings, and offered him a job. This led to his current career in illustration.

    Find out exactly what a cartoon or an illustration is, and what its purpose should be. Creating a cartoon is about conveying a message, sometimes quite complex, in a very short time. We discover listening is an important ingredient in getting it right when creating a cartoon for someone else.

    Simon tells us the cartoonist must consider the idea being communicated, political correctness, and who the intended recipient of the message is, to help craft the cartoon.

    Finally, what is the future of cartooning in the media and video age?

    A key takeaway – you don’t have to be a great drawer to be cartoonist.

    Examples of Simon’s work

    Options to access to the podcast episode are:

    YouTube with Subtitles/Closed Captions (c)

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    *Transcript of this interview is also available*

    Whooshkaa podcast audio player

  • Listening or pretending to?

    John and Oscar Trimboli, who is what some might call a professional listener, discuss the finer points of listening.

    Oscar is an expert in communication whose goal is to create 100 million deep listeners worldwide. He highlights how listening starts with you, and not with the speaker.

    Discover how you can listen better, how you can prepare yourself to listen, even when you don’t feel like it, and what the purpose of listening really is.

    They also delve into the difference in speech between cultures, listening and communication within families, and much more.

    Find a number of resources at Oscars website

    Options to access to the podcast episode are:

    YouTube ( Subtitles/Closed Captions (c) will be available soon)

    Subtitles/closed captions (c) will be available soon on YouTube

    *Transcript of this interview is also available*

    Whooshkaa podcast audio player

  • Violence against women, walking without fear

    Alix Sampson a young, bisexual and socially innovative woman from the inner north of Melbourne, Australia joins the So…Podcast to talk about her community connection project that (literally) walks the talk.

    Brunswick Sole Mates, was an idea that Alix “birthed organically” in response to issues that had been challenging her local community.

    She loves to walk around her neighbourhood, before work, after work, usually when the sun is coming up or going down.

    But lately, Melbourne has felt unsafe for people walking alone, especially women.

    Several violent attacks against women had made not only Alix, but many members of the community feel unsafe when going for walks.

    For Alix, the answer was not to simply stay indoors. Nothing was going to stop her from doing what she wanted to do. So she took things into her own hands (or feet?) and created safety for herself and her community; a local walking group.

    Brunswick Sole Mates has since flourished into a group that is almost 1000 members strong.

    “All genders, faiths, cultural backgrounds, sexual orientations, identities, ages, levels of ability and fitness are welcome.” Brunswick Sole Mates Facebook Group Description (Alix Sampson)

    It’s not only a group for the socially inclined, the Sole Mates also love to go on ‘antisocial walks’ where people can walk alongside each other and feel no pressure to talk with others.

    It has become an inclusive space that fosters community connection and empowers personal autonomy. It allows for all members of the community to come together and feel safe, free to walk without fear.

    Options to access to the podcast episode are:

    YouTube with Subtitles/Closed Captions (c)

    Have you switched on subtitles/closed captions (c) on YouTube?

    *Transcript of this interview is also available*

    Whooshkaa podcast audio player

  • Take off your clothes, look at your skin

    John Mckenna talks to Dr Edward Upjohn MB.BS MMed FACD FACMS, a dermatologist in Melbourne, Australia, about different types of skin cancers and treatments.

    Dr Edward Upjohn

    Dr Edward Upjohn talks about the three different types of skin cancers and how to potentially identify them:

    • Melanoma
    • Squamous cell carcinomas (SCC)
    • Basel cell carcinoma (BCC)

    Your General Practitioner (GP) is the best starting point if you notice something different on your skin. They use a device called a dermatoscope to examine skin spots and are trained in biopsy which means removing a sample of your skin to test, and if required your GP may refer you to a dermatologist.

    A skin cancer known as a melanoma can look like a mole and can be serious. Talk to your GP if you notice a new spot on your skin or an existing spot that has changed in shape, colour or is feeling uncomfortable.

    Non–melanoma cancers can cause soreness and can look like a pimple.

    Dr Edward Upjohn spoke about advancements in treatments over the past 20 years, such as creams and new drugs.

    Dr Edward Upjohn specialises in MOHs surgery, which is a type of surgery that can give immediate confirmation that all the skin cancer has been removed.

    Normally it is a day procedure involving a local anaesthetic.

    During this procedure a tissue sample is removed and then immediately checked in a laboratory so that the surgeon knows where the skin cancer is located and further tissue can then be removed if required, instead of waiting for test results which can take a number of days.

    Dr Edward Upjohn quoted a well-knownphrase – “early diagnosis can save lives” which he says is especially true for skin cancers. While it may be embarrassing to get undressed in front of your doctor, the skin cancer doesn’t stop, so continuous skin checks with your GP is a must.

    www.edwardupjohn.com

    Options to access to the podcast episode are:

    YouTube with Subtitles/Closed Captions (c)

    Have you switched on subtitles/closed captions (c) on YouTube?

    *Transcript of this interview is now available*

    Whooshkaa podcast audio player

  • Reclaim, Reform, Restore

    When you walk past hard rubbish on the street, what do you see?

    Meg Renou doesn’t just see a pile of junk, she sees inspiration. She describes herself as a bowerbird due to her love of collecting discarded objects and giving them a new and different life

    John talks to Meg about her reclaimed, reformed and restored art business that she runs in Melbourne. A kitchen table project she started a few years ago has become a creative passion, an outlet for letting go.

    Meg finds and reclaims objects that other people would consider junk, she reforms them into something different and restores life into it. From dragonflies made out of venetian blinds to mushrooms made out of teapot lids, for Meg the possibilities are endless.

    ‘I want to keep its history and recognition of what it was while also showing how it has been transformed’ – Meg

    And it’s not just about the objects, it’s a form of meditation for Meg. When she uses her hands to create, her mind is able to switch off and just breathe for a moment.

    She puts love and care into her pieces, her ideas and feelings to take a physical form allowing her to let go.

    What is your outlet? How do you find time to breathe?

    Meg Renou’s Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/meg.renou/?hl=en

    Options to access to the podcast episode are:

    YouTube with Subtitles/Closed Captions (c)

    Have you switched on subtitles/closed captions (c) on YouTube?

    *Transcript of this interview is also available*

    Whooshkaa podcast audio player

  • It’s Okay to Talk About Suicide

    This episode covers a sensitive topic. Before you listen please be aware that we are discussing suicide, the impact of suicide and resources surrounding suicide prevention.

    John talks with Shayne Connell, the CEO of LivingWorks.

    LivingWorks is an organisation that has been running for over 40 years and is focussed on suicide prevention.

    Shane believes in the principles of community development, the LivingWorks training model focusses on training people from within the communities they are working with and using co-design to design their modules.

    This means that their work is directly tailored for the communities they are working with, allowing these groups to decide what is important for them.

    At the heart of their work is empowering individuals to have choice over how and when they talk about suicide.

    “Suicide is a human condition, anyone can fall into crisis and distress where suicide becomes an option” Shayne Connell

    Suicide can effect the community in a multitude of ways, it is a silent killer that can impact anybody.

    Because of this Shane believes that it is everyone’s responsibility and opportunity to learn the skills to identify suicide and keep people safe.

    A key takeaway message for me was that suicide prevention training is just as important (if not more) as basic First Aid training in keeping the community safe.

    So it’s great that LivingWorks is here to walk alongside us and educate the community on suicide prevention.

    If this topic has brought up anything for you, it’s okay. Look after yourself as best you can.

    If you need further support:

    Lifeline 13 11 14

    Beyond Blue 1300 22 4636

    Options to access to the podcast episode are:

    YouTube with Subtitles/Closed Captions (c)

    Have you switched on subtitles/closed captions (c) on YouTube?

    *Transcript of this interview is also available*

    Whooshkaa podcast audio player

  • Wake up Aged Care Providers: Technology can help

    How can technology keep your loved ones in Aged Care safer and more connected?

    John O’Callaghan from Acsess Health talks about his game-changing products in Aged Care support.

    Acsess Health was founded in 2004 and are innovative leaders in using technology to improve accessibility.

    In this episode we dive into the world of technology, how it can empower us to support our loved ones and take the pressure off the hardworking carers.

    John O’Callaghan talks us through two of his revolutionary products:

    • Safe and secure screening technology
      • An easier way to protect your loved ones from the impact of COVID that doesn’t sap resources and gives us a good sense of security
    • Staying connected during COVID
      • A magic box that connects to your loved one’s TV in the aged care facility and lets them video chat, look at your photos and, it’s controlled and set up remotely by family members from their home.

    In a time where health resources are under pressure, it’s great to see technology provide the solutions.

    Options to access to the podcast episode are:

    YouTube with Subtitles/Closed Captions (c)

    Have you switched on subtitles/closed captions (c) on YouTube?

    *Transcript of this interview is also available*

    Whooshkaa podcast audio player

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