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‘So…’ Podcast Episodes

LIST OF EPISODES

  • How to Lose Friends & Influence White People

    Why are all television newsreaders blonde?

    This is something Antoinette asked herself when she was at the gym almost 4 years ago and confronted with a sea of blonde newsreaders across every news show that was being broadcast. She looked from the TV to the people in the gym and saw people of all cultural backgrounds. She saw that the media was failing to represent Australia’s diverse community.

    In that moment, Antoinette conceived the idea of Media Diversity Australia, a not-for-profit that advocates for more meaningful diversity within Australian media.

    Antoinette Lattouf is a Senior Journalist at Network 10, the Co-Founder/Director of Media Diversity Australia and is in the process of adding author to the list. She has built a successful career in Australian media, and as a woman of colour, has experienced firsthand the need for more cultural diversity within the industry.

    ‘We pat ourselves on the back for being a multicultural country, but we’re only multicultural to a certain point. There are certain institutions where that diversity isn’t allowed to prosper.’ Antoinette Lattouf

    She believes that the Australian media needs to do more work to reflect its audience and is a vocal advocate for increased diverse cultural representation.

    An exciting element of her advocacy is the upcoming release of her book How to Lose Friends and Influence White People. Antoinette’s ‘cheeky’ take on a book that has been read by generations of people is set to upheave some cultural tension, raise more than a few eyebrows, and make lots of people uncomfortable.

    And why? Because it’s important to provide a guide on how to navigate this complicated conversation, to challenge the status quo, and to provide the voice the Australian media has neglected.

    Is Antoinette scared of the potential backlash? Nope. She’s charging forward, brave and ready. She says, ‘If I don’t push myself out of my comfort zone, how can I ask others to do the same?’

    Options to access to the podcast episode are:

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    *Transcript of this interview is also available*

  • The Power of Representation and Role Modelling

    International students in the Australian news and media often carry the negative connotations of being “foreign”, “problems” that are “exploited”.

    Belle Lim is here to challenge that stereotype.

    Coming from Malaysia at the age of 17, Belle completed a Bachelor’s degree in Pharmaceutical Sciences with honours as the Gold Medallist, received the prestigious Victorian Premier Award for International Students of the Year in 2019, and is currently pursuing a PhD degree in cancer genetics. Driven by her personal experience, Belle is also a passionate advocate for international students and women of colour. She is the founder of Future Female conference in Victoria and the national president of Council of International Students Australia.

    Belle joined the So…Podcast to explore her journey so far. From a shy, reserved girl whose culture praised her for being obedient, to a young woman confident in her quest to empower other women from culturally diverse backgrounds. Belle shared the inner thoughts, confusion and breakthroughs that she had throughout this journey of discovering her real abilities, whilst also unpacking the cultural transition that international students are confronted with and how the burden of assimilating is placed solely on international students.

    Belle strongly believes in the power of representation and role modelling to expand what young people from diverse cultural backgrounds expect from themselves. On tips to ambitious women, she emphasized on the power of knowing your values and having the right attitude – adversities and challenges will come, but it is how you approach them that will ultimately define your journey.

    Options to access to the podcast episode are:

    YouTube with Subtitles/Closed Captions (c)

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    *Transcript of this interview will soon be available*

  • Women’s Experiences of Violence Across the Lifespan
    CONTENT WARNING: Violence against women and abuse.

    Violence against women is a major global public health problem. In Australia, one in six women have experienced violence from an intimate partner and more than one woman a week dies as a result of violence against women.

    PhD candidate Amy Warren and John discuss how this important issue is being addressed in Australia, around the world and what we can do to further these efforts. They look at the impact of fear and stigma, culture, and disability on experiences of abuse.

    Amy’s PhD project, ‘Violence against women across the lifespan’, explores violence against women across three categories of abuse: child abuse, domestic/family violence, and elder abuse.

    The project also explores how we can better support women whose experiences don’t fit into any of these categories, and how anyone can be a victim/survivor of violence.

    This episode may cover sensitive or triggering topics. If you feel that you need any support please use one of the below resources.

    To keep up with Amy’s research, you can follow The WEVAL Project on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.

    Options to access to the podcast episode are:

    YouTube with Subtitles/Closed Captions (c)

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    Anchor podcast audio player

    *Transcript of this interview is also available*

  • Disability Advocacy & Counselling, Working together

    In Australia we live in a world of ‘Royal Commissions’. Currently, the conversations are around the Royal Commission into Violence, Abuse, Neglect and Exploitation of People with Disability (known as the Disability Royal Commission).  To dive into this further, So…Podcast is joined by two prominent people in the disability advocacy and trauma-informed counselling space.

    Mary Mallet is the CEO of the Disability Advocacy Network Australia (DANA), which is the peak body for independent disability advocacy in Australia.

    Dr Cathy Kezelman AM is the President of Blue Knot Foundation which is the National Centre of Excellence for Complex Trauma. Blue Knot operates the National Counselling and Referral Service for people with disability who have experienced violence, abuse, neglect or exploitation

    The Disability Royal Commission emerged in response to the years of advocacy and self-advocacy work that aimed to create a platform where people could share their stories and have them heard.

    It’s not surprising that a Royal Commission of this nature can cause many different reactions. Some people may feel empowered to make a submission, some may feel retraumatised as the Royal Commission opens up old wounds, and some may just feel confused and unsure of how to engage with it.

    Mary Mallet and Dr Cathy Kezelman represent two modes of support that currently exist for people who are affected by the Disability Royal Commission: advocacy and counselling.

    Mary says that “advocacy is doing the ‘doing’ work”. It’s supporting people with practical actions such as making a submission, or a phone call, or reading through a document.

    Counselling offers support of a different kind, the emotional.

    So how do you know what is right for you?

    There is no one answer. Trauma can present itself in many different ways, and affects each person differently. What is important to know is that each service exists to understand an individual’s complex needs and support them as best they can.

    It’s about providing trust, understanding and somebody to walk alongside you.

    This episode may cover sensitive or triggering topics. If you feel that you need any support please use one of the below resources.

    https://www.blueknot.org.au/

    https://www.lifeline.org.au/

    https://www.beyondblue.org.au/

    Options to access to the podcast episode are:

    YouTube with Subtitles/Closed Captions (c)

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    Anchor podcast audio player

    *Transcript of this interview is also available*

  • Shedding leaf light with Trace Balla

    Children’s author and illustrator Trace Balla has always had a great fascination with trees and nature.

    Growing up, if she felt lonely she found companionship and comfort in the tree that grew in her garden. She called this her ‘tree friend’.

    Trees, Trace says, have seen a lot and felt a lot. They carry a natural wisdom that is difficult for humans to tap into. Trace overcomes this by ‘tree connecting’, using a physical experience such as a hug to surrender her body into trees and let them hold her and her emotions.

    This relationship with trees has informed her work as an author and illustrator. Her children’s book Rivertime showcases the beautiful wisdom of the natural Australian landscape that Trace is now surrounded by in her home country town in – Dja Dja Wurrung Country – Southern Australia.

    Trace’s love for trees has gifted her with friendships, lessons and support that are completely unique, shedding ‘leaf light’ upon all aspects of her life and walking alongside her as she experiences the world.

    Options to access to the podcast episode are:

    YouTube with Subtitles/Closed Captions (c)

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    Anchor podcast audio player

    *Transcript of this interview is also available*

  • The strength in being vulnerable – Rugare Gomo

    In Australia we rely on the Western media to hear about what’s happening across the globe. It shows us filtered versions of important world events and the voices of people these news stories are about can often be missed.

    Rugare Gomo, founder of the Gomo Foundation, joins the So…Podcast to bring some of these voices to listeners everywhere.

    Rugare grew up in Zimbabwe, in a context where white people were considered better than black people, where being gay could get you put in jail and where men were considered more valuable than women. Even though the women in his life were smart, entrepreneurial and driven, they were deprived of opportunity.

    He came to Australia when he was 16 with just a suitcase and the dream of having an education he would never have in his home country.

    Rugare lets us in on the ups and downs of his journey, from raising over $100,000 for his university education, to becoming a lawyer, to feeling alone and unhappy and eventually founding the Gomo Foundation.

    He started this not-for-profit to unleash the potential of girls in Africa through education. It has now grown into an organisation that gives young girls a voice and empowers them to create opportunity for themselves.

    His story is a unique one, that has seen many different sides of the world and significant tests and challenges. But, through the power in vulnerability, Rugare was able to accomplish everything he had ever wanted and more.

    Options to access to the podcast episode are:

    YouTube with Subtitles/Closed Captions (c)

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    Anchor podcast audio player

    *Transcript of this interview is also available*

  • SHHHH! Can we talk for a moment about turning down the noise?

    It may sound like a contradiction, to have a chat about being more quiet. But that’s exactly what John does with Christine Jackman in this podcast.

    Christine’s 20-year career as a journalist took her to New York as a foreign correspondent and Canberra, where she worked in Australia’s National Press Gallery, covering federal politics. Then she was headhunted to corporate communications where she gave advice to some of Australia’s top business and political leaders.

    Along the way, her life got very noisy and her health and family relationships suffered. So she quit her job and went on a journey to find out what was creating the “noise” in her life, what it was doing to her (according to scientific and medical research) and whether there were ways to reduce the unhealthy impacts of living in a noisy modern world.

    John and Christine chat about what she discovered: about the noise in our heads, as well as the noise around us; the distraction of the news and social media; the healing power of Nature and meditation; and the challenges of going on a 10-day silent retreat.

    Christine also gives some tips about how to incorporate more quiet places and practices into your own life.

    Her book Turning Down the Noise was published in Australia in September 2020 by Murdoch Books, and will be released in the United Kingdom in early 2021.

    Options to access to the podcast episode are:

    YouTube with Subtitles/Closed Captions (c)

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    *Transcript of this interview is also available*

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  • Danielle Matthews “How do I tell stories?…I sing”

    The creative behind I’ve Never BIN to Me (YouTube) joins the So…Podcast to talk about the power of music.

    After taking inspiration from the viral Facebook page ‘Bin Isolation Outing’, which encouraged individuals in lockdown to fancy dress while taking the bin out, Danielle Matthews decided to put her spin on ‘dressing up’ to take the bin out.

    She wrote a parody of I’ve Never Been to Me by Charlene, exploring what it felt like to be in lockdown in Victoria.

    After 48 hours her video had 1 thousand views. Danielle realised that her parody did more than make people laugh, it connected with other people who have also been struggling in lockdown.

    And Danielle is not only an internet sensation. She is a ‘born singer’, working professional for over 20 years. She says that she grew up singing, and there was never a question of what path she would follow.

    This path has taken her around the world, seeing incredible things and meeting incredible people, eventually bringing her back to Melbourne where she is the Co-Artistic Director of the Choir of Hard Knocks.

    This Choir displays the power and beauty of music. A choir for people who experience all kinds of disadvantage, it has shown Danielle that no matter what people go through, the music never leaves and it can always bring back joy.

    Danielle brings her warmth and vibrant love for music to the So…Podcast… if you listen closely there might even be a surprise tune!

    Options to access to the podcast episode are:

    YouTube with Subtitles/Closed Captions (c)

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    *Transcript of this interview is also available*

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  • Drawing the talk with Simon Kneebone

    In this episode John chats with Simon Kneebone – a cartoonist who’s work has been featured in a number of places, including many social and community organisations. Simon had his start as a cartoonist by simply doodling and drawing pictures during his time at university. Someone he had studied with remembered his drawings, and offered him a job. This led to his current career in illustration.

    Find out exactly what a cartoon or an illustration is, and what its purpose should be. Creating a cartoon is about conveying a message, sometimes quite complex, in a very short time. We discover listening is an important ingredient in getting it right when creating a cartoon for someone else.

    Simon tells us the cartoonist must consider the idea being communicated, political correctness, and who the intended recipient of the message is, to help craft the cartoon.

    Finally, what is the future of cartooning in the media and video age?

    A key takeaway – you don’t have to be a great drawer to be cartoonist.

    Examples of Simon’s work

    Options to access to the podcast episode are:

    YouTube with Subtitles/Closed Captions (c)

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    *Transcript of this interview is also available*

    Anchor podcast audio player

  • Listening or pretending to?

    John and Oscar Trimboli, who is what some might call a professional listener, discuss the finer points of listening.

    Oscar is an expert in communication whose goal is to create 100 million deep listeners worldwide. He highlights how listening starts with you, and not with the speaker.

    Discover how you can listen better, how you can prepare yourself to listen, even when you don’t feel like it, and what the purpose of listening really is.

    They also delve into the difference in speech between cultures, listening and communication within families, and much more.

    Find a number of resources at Oscars website

    Options to access to the podcast episode are:

    YouTube ( Subtitles/Closed Captions (c) will be available soon)

    Subtitles/closed captions (c) will be available soon on YouTube

    *Transcript of this interview is also available*

    Anchor podcast audio player

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