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‘So…’ Podcast Episodes

LIST OF EPISODES

  • Violence against women, walking without fear

    Alix Sampson a young, bisexual and socially innovative woman from the inner north of Melbourne, Australia joins the So…Podcast to talk about her community connection project that (literally) walks the talk.

    Brunswick Sole Mates, was an idea that Alix “birthed organically” in response to issues that had been challenging her local community.

    She loves to walk around her neighbourhood, before work, after work, usually when the sun is coming up or going down.

    But lately, Melbourne has felt unsafe for people walking alone, especially women.

    Several violent attacks against women had made not only Alix, but many members of the community feel unsafe when going for walks.

    For Alix, the answer was not to simply stay indoors. Nothing was going to stop her from doing what she wanted to do. So she took things into her own hands (or feet?) and created safety for herself and her community; a local walking group.

    Brunswick Sole Mates has since flourished into a group that is almost 1000 members strong.

    “All genders, faiths, cultural backgrounds, sexual orientations, identities, ages, levels of ability and fitness are welcome.” Brunswick Sole Mates Facebook Group Description (Alix Sampson)

    It’s not only a group for the socially inclined, the Sole Mates also love to go on ‘antisocial walks’ where people can walk alongside each other and feel no pressure to talk with others.

    It has become an inclusive space that fosters community connection and empowers personal autonomy. It allows for all members of the community to come together and feel safe, free to walk without fear.

    Options to access to the podcast episode are:

    YouTube with Subtitles/Closed Captions (c)

    Have you switched on subtitles/closed captions (c) on YouTube?

    Whooshkaa podcast audio player

    *Transcript of this interview is also available*

  • Take off your clothes, look at your skin

    John Mckenna talks to Dr Edward Upjohn MB.BS MMed FACD FACMS, a dermatologist in Melbourne, Australia, about different types of skin cancers and treatments.

    Dr Edward Upjohn

    Dr Edward Upjohn talks about the three different types of skin cancers and how to potentially identify them:

    • Melanoma
    • Squamous cell carcinomas (SCC)
    • Basel cell carcinoma (BCC)

    Your General Practitioner (GP) is the best starting point if you notice something different on your skin. They use a device called a dermatoscope to examine skin spots and are trained in biopsy which means removing a sample of your skin to test, and if required your GP may refer you to a dermatologist.

    A skin cancer known as a melanoma can look like a mole and can be serious. Talk to your GP if you notice a new spot on your skin or an existing spot that has changed in shape, colour or is feeling uncomfortable.

    Non–melanoma cancers can cause soreness and can look like a pimple.

    Dr Edward Upjohn spoke about advancements in treatments over the past 20 years, such as creams and new drugs.

    Dr Edward Upjohn specialises in MOHs surgery, which is a type of surgery that can give immediate confirmation that all the skin cancer has been removed.

    Normally it is a day procedure involving a local anaesthetic.

    During this procedure a tissue sample is removed and then immediately checked in a laboratory so that the surgeon knows where the skin cancer is located and further tissue can then be removed if required, instead of waiting for test results which can take a number of days.

    Dr Edward Upjohn quoted a well-knownphrase – “early diagnosis can save lives” which he says is especially true for skin cancers. While it may be embarrassing to get undressed in front of your doctor, the skin cancer doesn’t stop, so continuous skin checks with your GP is a must.

    www.edwardupjohn.com

    Options to access to the podcast episode are:

    YouTube with Subtitles/Closed Captions (c)

    Have you switched on subtitles/closed captions (c) on YouTube?

    Whooshkaa podcast audio player

    *Transcript of this interview is now available*

  • Reclaim, Reform, Restore

    When you walk past hard rubbish on the street, what do you see?

    Meg Renou doesn’t just see a pile of junk, she sees inspiration. She describes herself as a bowerbird due to her love of collecting discarded objects and giving them a new and different life

    John talks to Meg about her reclaimed, reformed and restored art business that she runs in Melbourne. A kitchen table project she started a few years ago has become a creative passion, an outlet for letting go.

    Meg finds and reclaims objects that other people would consider junk, she reforms them into something different and restores life into it. From dragonflies made out of venetian blinds to mushrooms made out of teapot lids, for Meg the possibilities are endless.

    ‘I want to keep its history and recognition of what it was while also showing how it has been transformed’ – Meg

    And it’s not just about the objects, it’s a form of meditation for Meg. When she uses her hands to create, her mind is able to switch off and just breathe for a moment.

    She puts love and care into her pieces, her ideas and feelings to take a physical form allowing her to let go.

    What is your outlet? How do you find time to breathe?

    Meg Renou’s Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/meg.renou/?hl=en

    Options to access to the podcast episode are:

    YouTube with Subtitles/Closed Captions (c)

    Have you switched on subtitles/closed captions (c) on YouTube?

    Whooshkaa podcast audio player

    *Transcript of this interview is also available*

  • It’s Okay to Talk About Suicide

    This episode covers a sensitive topic. Before you listen please be aware that we are discussing suicide, the impact of suicide and resources surrounding suicide prevention.

    John talks with Shayne Connell, the CEO of LivingWorks.

    LivingWorks is an organisation that has been running for over 40 years and is focussed on suicide prevention.

    Shane believes in the principles of community development, the LivingWorks training model focusses on training people from within the communities they are working with and using co-design to design their modules.

    This means that their work is directly tailored for the communities they are working with, allowing these groups to decide what is important for them.

    At the heart of their work is empowering individuals to have choice over how and when they talk about suicide.

    “Suicide is a human condition, anyone can fall into crisis and distress where suicide becomes an option” Shayne Connell

    Suicide can effect the community in a multitude of ways, it is a silent killer that can impact anybody.

    Because of this Shane believes that it is everyone’s responsibility and opportunity to learn the skills to identify suicide and keep people safe.

    A key takeaway message for me was that suicide prevention training is just as important (if not more) as basic First Aid training in keeping the community safe.

    So it’s great that LivingWorks is here to walk alongside us and educate the community on suicide prevention.

    If this topic has brought up anything for you, it’s okay. Look after yourself as best you can.

    If you need further support:

    Lifeline 13 11 14

    Beyond Blue 1300 22 4636

    Options to access to the podcast episode are:

    YouTube with Subtitles/Closed Captions (c)

    Have you switched on subtitles/closed captions (c) on YouTube?

    Whooshkaa podcast audio player

    *Transcript of this interview is also available*

  • Wake up Aged Care Providers: Technology can help

    How can technology keep your loved ones in Aged Care safer and more connected?

    John O’Callaghan from Acsess Health talks about his game-changing products in Aged Care support.

    Acsess Health was founded in 2004 and are innovative leaders in using technology to improve accessibility.

    In this episode we dive into the world of technology, how it can empower us to support our loved ones and take the pressure off the hardworking carers.

    John O’Callaghan talks us through two of his revolutionary products:

    • Safe and secure screening technology
      • An easier way to protect your loved ones from the impact of COVID that doesn’t sap resources and gives us a good sense of security
    • Staying connected during COVID
      • A magic box that connects to your loved one’s TV in the aged care facility and lets them video chat, look at your photos and, it’s controlled and set up remotely by family members from their home.

    In a time where health resources are under pressure, it’s great to see technology provide the solutions.

    Options to access to the podcast episode are:

    YouTube with Subtitles/Closed Captions (c)

    Have you switched on subtitles/closed captions (c) on YouTube?

    Whooshkaa podcast audio player

    *Transcript of this interview is also available*

  • Good & bad experiences for International Students in Australia

    During the conversation with Philip Liu from Melbourne Australia, who is a strong advocate for international students, we covered the following areas:

    • Conscious and unconscious racist perceptions towards people of Asian descent.
    • Be yourself, don’t change because of peer pressure
    • How international students in Australia can remain resilient and not feel like they need to say sorry all the time
    • Strategies in managing anxiety & confusion for international students during stressful time
    • The important roles & sacrifices that international students make when entering Australia’s work force

    Options to access to the podcast episode are:

    YouTube with Subtitles/Closed Captions (c)

    Have you switched on subtitles/closed captions (c) on YouTube?

    Whooshkaa podcast audio player

    *Transcript of this interview is also available*

  • Collective messages from Disability Service Providers across Australia

    “I’m not shaking your hand mate, I don’t care who you are.”

    This is one of the quotes that stuck in my mind, as I was producing this episode you are about to experience.

    It’s a response from a client who was interacting with a Chief Executive Officer from an Australian Disability Service Provider.

    The CEO acknowledged “that sometimes you just got to stop and reflect, so that we can be reminded that when we need to do things rightly, advice can come from people we wouldn’t normally expect.”

    No matter what business you are in, I believe there are many takeaway messages that you will relate to, with this episode.

    My takeaway message after listening to this episode is that organisations are responding quickly as situations are continuingly changing.

    There are hopefully now less boxes to be ticked before things can be approved.

    Right now, it’s all about being responsive when creating innovative ways to support people.
    Whist at the same time continue to listen to the people who are being supported.

    I would like to thank the 11 CEO’s from Disability Services Providers from around Australia who contributed by leaving short recorded messages of innovation, support, and creativity during COVID-19 period.

    Another great highlight for me was understanding how each organisation is uniquely different.

    Thank you to the National Disability Services for assisting in finding organisations who chose to be a part of this episode.

    SelfHelp
    Multicap
    Activ Foundation
    Aruma
    OCConnections
    Wallara
    Helping People Achieve
    genU
    Community Living Australia
    Mambourin
    SCOPE

    Options to access to the podcast episode are:

    YouTube with Subtitles/Closed Captions (c)

    Have you switched on subtitles/closed captions (c) on YouTube?

    Whooshkaa podcast audio player

    *Transcript of this interview is also available*

  • Disability, it’s a joke, for some

    Tim Ferguson and I had a funny chat, to be expected, as he is a professional comedian.

    (From his website cheekymonkeycomedy.com)

    Tim is a widely acclaimed comedian, writer and producer. He’s toured the world performing stand-up and musical comedy, co-writing dozens of live stage comedy shows and light entertainment programmes.

    What made this conversation meaningful for me was that we spoke heart to heart as two people with disabilities and how we use humour when we interact with the rest of the world.

    Tim has multiple sclerosis and I’ve had a physical disability since birth.

    A lot of the discussion was also focused on what is humour and does it really matter if it offends others?

    Options to access to the podcast episode are:

    YouTube with Subtitles/Closed Captions (c)

    Whooshkaa podcast audio player


    *Transcript of this interview is also available*

  • Supporting those who are missing out on podcast

    Christina Canters from Podcast Services Australia and producer and host of ‘Stand Out Get Noticed’ podcast joined me to talk about “Supporting those who are missing out on podcasts”

    Christina’s insights into understanding the podcast audience enriched our conversation which focused on people who are not listening to podcasts and why.

    Christina and I shared different strategies for podcast listeners who are interested in helping others connect with podcasts.

    Existing barriers include accessible formats for the Deaf community, and senior members of our community missing out due to not having a good understanding of technology.

    Options to access to the podcast episode are:

    YouTube with Subtitles/Closed Captions (c)

    Have you switched on subtitles/closed captions (c) on YouTube?

    Whooshkaa podcast audio player


    *Transcript of this interview is also available*

  • Social isolation is not new to us

    In the spirit of staying connected during these times, the following 12 recordings are from individuals who live with disabilities such as, Schizoaffective disorder, Deaf Blindness, Cerebral palsy, Oculocutaneous Albinism, physical and intellectual disabilities and want to share their own personal message to the world.

    What’s evident for me after listening to these insights, is that people with disabilities already live everyday with skills around being adaptable and robust.

    As the community navigates through these changing times, there needs to be a mind shift, so that people with disabilities are seen as a valuable resource, who, on a daily basis are resilient and creative whist remaining positive when it comes to living in the broader community.

    I sincerely thank the people who left recorded messages using their mobile phone, my support team Xinxin & Jian who were fantastic when it comes to making this technology work.

    Also I must acknowledge the continuing support from OutScribe Transcription Services who transcribed all of my episodes so that they are accessible to all.

    Options to access to the podcast episode are:

    YouTube with Subtitles/Closed Captions (c)

    Have you switched on subtitles/closed captions (c) on YouTube?

    Whooshkaa podcast audio player

    *Transcript of this interview is also available*

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